West Coast

West Coast

Ireland’s West – Home to the Wild Atlantic Way

Artists have been making a pilgrimage to Galway and Ireland’s west coast for centuries, and many of them never leave. Attracted by the mesmerising Atlantic light, the rich Gaelic culture, and the personality of the people, fans of the West of Ireland are enchanted by its spell.

Connemara

Immerse yourself in the true spirit of Ireland by touring Connemara. The spectacular Lough Inagh Drive brings you through mystical boglands and past the rugged isolation of the Maumturk Mountains and the Twelve Bens. Take in a visit to 19th-century monastic Benedictine abbey at Kylemore, with its magnificent neo-Gothic church, Victorian walled gardens, and the abbey itself — which was built for Benedictine nuns who escaped from Belgium during World War I.

You can also find out more about Connemara and its significance at the Connemara National Park Visitor Centre in Letterfrack. Then there is the beautiful coastal route to Ballyconneely, where Alcock & Brown landed in 1919, having completed the first ever nonstop, east-to-west transatlantic flight. The ocean drive continues to Roundstone and Ballynahinch Castle.

Galway City

A unique mix of the ancient and the modern, Galway City is a walled, 12th-century settlement on the edge of the Atlantic. Explore the Spanish Arch, the Claddagh, and Eyre Square and take in the delights of the aptly-named Shop Street. Galway is also a renowned hub for Irish culture, so make sure you take in some of the fine traditional music played in pubs and venues across the city, as well as the rich art and theatre.

Cliffs of Moher

Having narrowly missed out on a place in the New 7 Wonders of the World, the Cliffs of Moher are justifiably one of Ireland’s biggest attractions. They rise to 214 metres (702 feet) at their peak and are set in the ethereal limestone landscape of the Burren National Park.

Connemara

Immerse yourself in the true spirit of Ireland by touring Connemara. The spectacular Lough Inagh Drive brings you through mystical boglands and past the rugged isolation of the Maumturk Mountains and the Twelve Bens. Take in a visit to 19th-century monastic Benedictine abbey at Kylemore, with its magnificent neo-Gothic church, Victorian walled gardens, and the abbey itself — which was built for Benedictine nuns who escaped from Belgium during World War I.

You can also find out more about Connemara and its significance at the Connemara National Park Visitor Centre in Letterfrack. Then there is the beautiful coastal route to Ballyconneely, where Alcock & Brown landed in 1919, having completed the first ever nonstop, east-to-west transatlantic flight. The ocean drive continues to Roundstone and Ballynahinch Castle.

Galway City

A unique mix of the ancient and the modern, Galway City is a walled, 12th-century settlement on the edge of the Atlantic. Explore the Spanish Arch, the Claddagh, and Eyre Square and take in the delights of the aptly-named Shop Street. Galway is also a renowned hub for Irish culture, so make sure you take in some of the fine traditional music played in pubs and venues across the city, as well as the rich art and theatre.

Cliffs of Moher

Having narrowly missed out on a place in the New 7 Wonders of the World, the Cliffs of Moher are justifiably one of Ireland’s biggest attractions. They rise to 214 metres (702 feet) at their peak and are set in the ethereal limestone landscape of the Burren National Park.

What our clients have to say...

The tour guide was wonderful and even sang us a couple of Irish folk songs. Our guide, Padraic, recommended that instead of Bailey’s we go to another pub that James Joyce frequented, where there were pictures of Joyce and some of his manuscripts on the walls. We drank a toast there to Joyce and talked some more about Dubliners, the students were able to get wifi on their phones, Padraic talked to some of them about Dublin at length, and everyone was happy (including me).

PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY, USA

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